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Irish photo Tag

Glendalough irish landscape photo by Barry Hendrickson

Captivating Glendalough

Barry and I were just a few days into our first trip into Ireland, when we drove to Wicklow County to see Glendalough. The word Glendalough in Gaelic is Gleann Dá Loch meaning Glen of the Two Lakes, which is so fitting for this serene photograph. Not too far from this beautiful lake is the home one of Ireland’s most impressive monasteries. I found this ancient site captivating....

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Claddagh by Barry Hendrickson photo

Claddagh, an Irish Icon

  Claddagh County Galway, Ireland Barry Thomas Hendrickson, © Hendrickson Fine Art Photography   I learned about the Claddagh ring from my mother. It is a long lasting Irish symbol of love and faithfulness. The heart stands for love, the hands for friendship and the crown for loyalty.  My mother gave a Claddagh ring to each of her three daughters. So, I happily received my own Claddagh ring a few decades ago. I later learned that the ring is often used as a wedding ring, and how it is worn has meaning too. If the heart points inwards, you are spoken for, or when the heart is points away are open to a new love.   While Barry and I were visiting Galway City, we stumbled across...

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Ruins in the Valley, County Wicklow by Barry Hendrickson

Wandering the Wicklow Mountains

The Wicklow Mountains are not that far south of the city of Dublin. In the past centuries, these mountains were remote enough to have provide a refuge for opponents to the English rule. Rebels that took part in the 1798 Irish uprising, hid out in this region for years.   In 1800, the frustrated British started building a military road. This road was devised to help flush out the rebels, and in the end has only made this area more accessible. Currently, this winding road makes for a spectacular drive with many views of breathtaking scenery.    While wandering though the Wicklow Mountains, Barry and I discovered these ruins. One can only imagine what this structure was used for in the past. Barry...

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Rock of Cashel, County Tipperary, Ireland by Barry Thomas Hendrickson

Stone, Texture & Ancient History

Bring it on! This photograph ties all of these elements -- stone, texture and history -- together.  These carved Romanesque arches are believed to be from the 12th century. Barry and I found them in Cormac’s Chapel, one of the older structures atop the Rock of Cashel. I just love how the black and white medium shows off the texture and composition. A common theme woven among our photos.   We were traveling from Dublin to Kinsale, when we saw this giant stone arising out of the Tipperary plains. Hard to miss and super cool was the Rock of Cashel (Caiseal Mumhan in Gaelic). This ancient site was a symbol of power for Kings who ruled over this region for over a...

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"No Irish Need Apply" by Hendrickson Fine Art Photography 2019

No Irish Need Apply

No Irish Need Apply - How Soon We Forget. I usually like to spend a great amount of time working on an image before revealing it. However, I feel compelled by recent events to show the photograph here in its preliminary stage. Tacked to the wall of a pub is a sign, surrounded by currency from all parts of the world. It states “Help Wanted – No Irish Need Apply.” My ancestors were Irish immigrants....

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